Why I’m Left Feeling Bitterly Disappointed By Half Iron Man.

Three years ago I took part in, and completed my first ever Half Iron Man in East London. Upon crossing the finish line I burst into tears. I was elated, so proud and felt like I had achieved the impossible. (Turns out, it’s the 2nd hardest course in the world, so my feelings were justified I suppose). Fast-forward to 19 June 2016 when I crossed the finish line in Durban, and all I felt was a heavy heart and bitter disappointment.

It’s been a few days since finishing the race, and I’ve been trying to understand why I feel so ‘let down’ about the entire experience.

The weeks and month leading up to the race were not kind, and as mentioned here, the odds just seemed to be against me. When I did the race for the first time three years ago, I had a lot more time to train, people to train with and it was I Summer, which meant Winter with its debilitating cold, dark and sickness wasn’t an issue. Back to back bronchitis, chronic anemia, no sleep, shin splints, planning a first birthday party, a resignation from work and massive stress in my life left me feeling seriously fragile for most of my training.

We arrived in Durban on Thursday – to give us enough time to register, chill with the friends whose house we were staying at, and acclimatise for the race. The big rule before any event like this is easy; REST UP. Unfortunately, the Monday before, Carter had started with some severe gastro that was so bad we did what we have never done before and actually panicked enough to take him to the hospital. There, they declared a viral gastro infection and asked us to ‘wait it out’. On the Saturday before the race (having waited it out for 7 days) he was only getting worse; there was blood in his stools, he wasn’t sleeping, had a raging fever, was as miserable as sin and we were exhausted. We took him to the hospital in Durban and within twenty minutes he was admitted for dehydration and on a drip. Emotional doesn’t even begin to cut it, I was devastated for two reasons – one for my poor sick baby in hospital, with a now bacterial dysentery (the guilt!) and two, for the race in less than 15 hours time – which Barry and I had both trained so long and hard for, sacrificed family time for and had been planning for, for the better part of half a year. Barry insisted I still race – knowing that after this 70.3 I was probably going to give up triathlon for a bit and focus on finding some balance in my life. With a heavy heart I left the hospital to go and pack my transition bags and rack my bike. If it wasn’t for my friend Eryn who we were staying with – who had just completed the Full Iron Man – I probably would have given up there and then. Thankfully she got my mind right(ish), helped me pack my bags, nutrition and bike and helped me get to the race to set up. She also took me down to the race the next morning at 5 am and stood on the cooking hot pavements, with her hubby and son, and supported me the entire day.

On the same Saturday that Carter was admitted – before we took him to the hospital – we had the pre-race training swim. Normally the pre-swim is a free for all where athletes get to play in the water, get a feel for the waves, the current and the ocean. This year the ocean was not playing ball, and the race organisers seemed uneasy. They made it a swim where you had to queue up and head off 10 at a time, with the organisers checking people in and out using our timing chips. Alarm bells were ringing in my head, and as the queue got longer and longer and more and more swimmers were coming you the water looking less than happy, I was in full blown panic mode. After about an hour and a half of waiting to go in, they abruptly cancelled the pre-swim. The water was just too dangerous. My heart sunk a bit further into my chest. The swim was my Achilles heel and mentally I had been preparing myself for this single discipline the entire time. Distracted by a very unwell baby though, we left and took him to the hospital, as above.

After a last visit to see my baby and Barry in the paed ward, I went home to Eryn and Greg and slept surprisingly well (could be the red wine or Xanax..or both). Up to this pint I had also picked up a tiny bit of Carter’s gastro, which meant an upset tummy and zero appetite – also not great before a race).

Race morning arrived and I was up at 4 am. For those who take part or spectate in triathlons, you understand its not as simple as arriving and running in to the water. It’s a mammoth task of logistics, planning and time. Even though your bike and two transition bags are packed and racked the day before, you still have to get down to transition the morning of the race to pump tyres, stock nutrition and triple check you have everything you need in the relevant bag. I did this all and left the transition area to find Eryn. It was dark and fresh and a beautiful morning. My tummy was feeling better, Carter seemed to be on the mend, and I suddenly had a bit more optimism about the race. Then the race organisers made the announcement: The swim had just been cancelled.

3000 athletes went in to panic mode. This was the first time in 20 years that the swim had been cancelled – which meant that the ocean really wasn’t in a good mood. Many people were angry and quick to judge. I was gutted. The biggest challenge for me, and one that I finally felt ready for had been pulled form under me. Which meant we technically weren’t doing a triathlon – we were doing a duathlon. I, along with 2999 other athletes felt cheated.

The race, instead of a well oiled slick machine now turned into disorganised chaos. The pro athletes (only about 16 in total) still had to do the swim, and the rest of us plebs would start on the bike once they were done. We walked down to the swim, my mind now completely unraveled and watched them start. ‘The waves aren’t that high’ I thought to myself as I looked down. Then the gun went and the pros went off and the only thing I can liken it to was confetti being tossed into a gale force wind. Swimmers were everywhere. Some immediately got pushed several hundred meters to the left, others got pushed to shore and some just could not get past the surf. Two ladies had to be rescued and many of them (remember, all pro athletes) said they thought they were going to die. To give more context – take a look here.

It was while watching the pro swim that I realised the organisers had definitely made the right call. I can guarantee that several people would have lost their life that day should the swim not have been cancelled. However, that still didn’t stop the thoughts banging in my head. People just aren’t going to respect us now. People will say it wasn’t a real race.

Now, this is where I think I started feeling like a loser, and why the race has left me with a bad taste in my mouth. The bike start – instead of happening as people came out of the water – ie a staggered approach – but still relatively in line with your age groupers happened with all 3000 athletes at the same time, but actually not at the same time at all. Which meant a 2 hour queue as they let people off, five at a time every 15 seconds. I happened to be one of the very last in the queue, which meant that by the time I eventually started my bike, other athletes had already been out there for almost 2 hours. That does a lot for ones psyche, and even though your time only officially started once you had got on your bike and started cycling, mentally it felt like you were already behind. As an example, if athlete A started at the front of the queue and cycled a 4 hour race, and athlete B started at the back of the queue and cycled a 3 hour race, athlete A would still finish the bike first and start the run while athlete B was still riding. This is what happened to me, and even though I feel I had an OK’ish bike time (for me anyways!) I came off the bike and started the run when pretty much everyone had already started. Because of my late start, and the mentality of the organisers and volunteer staff being that of a normal race (ie cutoff times after swim and bike), by the time I turned around at the 40 km mark, people had already started packing up cones and aid stations and cars were flying past me on the freeways. Not cool. That, coupled with a really bad stitch in my shoulders made me a glum chap.

I got off my bike in transition and looked around in dismay – it seemed as if 90% of the bikes had been racked – which made perfect sense when you thought about it logically, but totally threw me, because even though I was well within my cutoff time, it felt like I was coming stone last. I started the run when most people were on their second lap, and so by the time I started my second lap, I had marshals rushing me along – again forgetting that I was making decent time and that time on the clock wasn’t an indicator of athlete performance. “I started 2 hours after everyone else!” I wanted to scream.

The run was shitty, and I will never again underestimate a ‘quick 21km’ again. Because it was completely flat I assumed it would be the best and easiest part of the day. It wasn’t. Flat means no hard uphill, but it also means no lovely downhill to relieve your legs. It was also 1 pm by the time I started, and 36 degrees.

I just felt the spectators at that point were disinterested, and I felt lonely for most of the run. Even my parents, who had come all the way to see me race, looked bored. I think it had been a long day of waiting, and due to the slow start, there wasn’t much excitement in terms of masses of athletes all competing at the same time. I could see them thinking ‘really, is this it?’

About 8 kms in I started running with a girl Siobhan who I met along the route and who mentally helped me a lot. I left her after a few kms as I was feeling a bit stronger, and she needed to walk a bit more. (I hope she somehow stumbles across this blog and makes contact – I never caught her last name, but we did commit to having lunch in Joburg together to celebrate not dying). The last 10 kms were much better than the first, and I kept a very slow but steady pace (race day goal was a 6:45 and I was managing between 7:30 and 8. I was hurting and the tummy cramps of the previous few days had flared up.).

On those last 10 kms, again due to the lateness of the day and mentality of how it’s usually done, a lot of the aid stations had closed up, sponges and water had run out and the promenade had been opened properly to the public. I ran into 2 people, was hit by a wayward soccer ball and had to dodge more than one child running in and out the crowds. By then I was close to despair and started going in to a very dark place.

Eventually, I finished, in my slowest 21 km time ever of 2:44. I crossed the finish line happy, grabbed my medal and T-shirt and made my way back to the supporters area. It was completely empty. That kind of (un)welcome does a lot for this already battered ego, and I felt so sad and despondent.

The positive to the race was that my baby boy was discharged that afternoon so he and hubby at-least got to see me on the route, which was a beautiful sight when you are empty and broken inside.

Sadly, I don’t feel as if the organisers handled the delayed start well, and I’m bitterly disappointed by how I was made to feel like a B grade athlete out there – at no fault of my own. I think the organisers had been prepped for a 7:30 am start and a cutoff by 15:30 – so when the plans changed and the time got pushed out, they weren’t aware that it was OK and athletes competing were not a bunch of losers. I also definitely know that having had the swim portion cut out – which actually made the race harder for some reason, has made me feel like a 2/3 Iron Man.

Does that mean I have unfinished business, and will be coming back next year to see it through? Probably not. I’m feeling a massive sense of relief that this race is over, and that I can focus on some other aspects of my life right now. Nothing that looks or sounds like a swim, bike or run… although, that’s what I said straight after my very first Half Iron man in 2013…

CJ was less than thrilled as well
CJ was less than thrilled as well

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I took this photo when the pros went out on their swim. You can see the lifeguards rushing in to assist a swimmer


Carter in hospital with bacterial dysentry
Race registration with Eryn
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Finishing in a time of 6:26
On the Friday we did a team swim. The water was harsh but not unmanageable.

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  1. God Kate, this does not sound like the post event high I would assume one would feel. I am so sorry that you were treated like that after all your crazy hard work. Watching simply through social media, it was clear how much training and time and mental anguish you went through to get your feet at the start. Don’t diminish what you did achieve, it’s massive and you should be immensely proud!!! All I can say is how sorry I am and that the time you have now to refocus on other things and your sweet sweet little boy, sounds exactly where you need to be. Well done Kate! Xx

    1. Thanks so much Debs, I guess it was just one of those things, and I really am happy I still crossed the finish line despite everything. Thanks for the really kind message!

  2. I’m sorry to hear that. One of the best things about all three of my Ironman experiences has been the support from not only the locals, but the marshals and volunteers. We’re all in it together from beginning through to the end. For them to be as dismissive as they were is really kak! I hope you share such with them. When they send their survey email out, be sure to give them this link. Durban is a new race and a lot of people have said it will soon be more popular than East London. If this the kind of thing happening, I’d rather do the second toughest course if not than just for the volunteers and support.

    Having said that and despite all the elements that weren’t on your side, you really did well and you should be proud of yourself!! Hope the little guy is back on track and that you’re recovered too. Have some more wine… You deserve it 🙂

    1. I definitely well. I definitely dont think it was a malicious thing, I just thing the organisers had been prepped for a 7:30 am start and a cutoff by 15:30 – so when the plans changed and the time got pushed out – they weren’t aware that it was OK and athletes competing were not a bunch of losers 🙂 I guess I might also be a tad sensitive about it all, this was my last race for a while. But, onwards and upwards!

  3. You are still a star in our eyes and can understand your frustration. And no we weren’t bored, we actually just enjoyed chilling and seeing you run past several times. Well done despite all the setbacks

  4. I don’t know you at all (although I do because we are ‘friends’ – I mean Boston owners are born friends!) but I admire you and the dedication!!!

    Carter being sick, Hubby pushing you to race and being your partner you really are a Super Mom!

    Congratulations… Besides the disorganization… I think you were superb! Amazing achievement! Well done!

  5. Gosh Kate that sounds awful. Do you know if it was the same race director who’s done East London for the last decade? Sounds like it wasn’t. The last time I did East London we had bad water conditions too & the plan was to do a run-bike-run if it came to it, which, thank Heavens, it didn’t, but the point is there was a plan. I’m sorry it was such a kak experience for you, it’s generally such a beautifully organized race. Think of it like this though- you finished a bloody grueling race in spite of all the odds being stacked against you. And I think that’s harder than finishing strong when you’re having a good race. Racing is not only about physical ability and strength… Well done, you’re still a hero to your family and especially to your little boy.

    1. Thanks so much Rebecca. I think it was the same organiser – I don’t blame them at all – i also think that Durban peeps haven’t opened themselves up this race yet – and I think there’s resistance everywhere the poor organisers turn – unlike EL where it’s the annual highlight! 😉

  6. “Some days you’re the windscreen, some days you’re the bug”
    We’ll done!! A very tough day out and many things contributing to the day.
    I have been on both extreme scales of Ironman fitness and sub 3 hour 94.7. Before that, I have also been so unfit and overweight, that I could not finish a 2 km run, without walking. To hear that you feel you were treated like the slow athlete at the back of the field is disappointing.

    One of the highlights of my IM race, was hearing a pro (after only finishing about 3 hours after his expected time) say that he was happy to finish and that every IM finish is a success, the time was a bonus.
    That made me proud and feel great.

    Every person out on the road, in the gym, in the pool, on the bike… is fighting some sort of battle.. sometimes even harder when”you don’t look the part”..

    So, try to ignore “other people’s stuff”, leave it in that horrible surf and reflect on a great personal achievement! You may not have beaten everyone on the day, but most importantly is that you beat the internal voice that says,”I can’t”.

    1. You are so right Brendan! I suppose the longer you are out there, the bigger the achievement 🙂

      A sub 3 94.7? Impressive!!

  7. I am so sorry Kate – we were on the route and I thought of you often! i can only sympathise with your feelings as I have never even considered trying to complete a Half Iron Man but I thought this all when the swim was cancelled and watching so many athletes start late, get frustrated, get penalised and then complete over do the bike or run, trying to make up for the swim… I am glad you managed to finish the race and get your little man discharged but so sorry for it all!! x

    1. Thanks so much Caley – in the larger scale of things its not a train smash. Atleast I didn’t have to tackle those awful waves!! x

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